JAKARTA  - Conservation group WWF said it spotted 18 critically endangered Irrawaddy dolphins in Indonesian waters off Borneo island Tuesday and called for greater protection of the species’ habitat. There is little data on the Irrawaddy dolphin — which resembles the common bottlenose dolphin but has no beak and a snub dorsal fin — and no comprehensive survey has been conducted to measure its global population.  “In the past, locals and fishermen reported seeing the dolphins, but we have never recorded them until now,” WWF conservation biologist Albertus Tjiu told AFP.  Over five days a research team surveyed 260 kilometres (160 miles) along the coast of West Kalimantan, on Indonesia’s half of Borneo island, and spotted the species travelling in small groups. The sightings show that the dolphins’ habitat is still intact, despite degradation by hundreds of pulp and charcoal plantations by the coast, Tjiu said. The team also encountered three Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins that live in the same type of ecosystem.