BONN - Syria told the UN climate talks in Bonn on Tuesday that it would join the Paris Agreement, leaving the United States as the only nation in the world opting to stay outside the landmark treaty.

"We are going to join the Paris Agreement," the Syrian delegate, speaking in Arabic, said during a plenary session at the 196-nation talks, according to Safa Al Jayoussi of the IndyAct NGO, who was monitoring the session.

The United States ratified the 2015 pact but US President Donald Trump announced earlier this year that he would pull out, saying the pact did not serve US interests. "It is our understanding that the government of Syria announced today their intent to join the Paris Agreement," Nick Nuttall, the spokesman for the UN climate body, told AFP.

Nuttall identified the Syrian delegate as Wadah Katmawi, the deputy minister of the ministry of local administration and environment. Syria must submit their "instruments of ratification" at the UN headquarters in New York before their adherence becomes official, he added.

Other parties at the 12-day negotiations, tasked with elaborating and implementing the agreement, welcomed the news.

"Syria joining the Paris Agreement will be a good thing," South Africa's chief negotiator Maesela Kekana told AFP.

"That's great," said Chai Qimin, a climate negotiator from China's National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation.

"They were the last party to the UN Convention to sign the Paris Agreement," he said, referring to 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the bedrock treaty for UN climate talks.

"That leaves only the one who announced their withdrawal," he added, in an oblique reference to the United States.

War-torn Syria would be the 197th country to sign on to the climate pact , which vows to hold global warming to "well below" two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). Openly isolated on the climate issue at G-7 and G-20 meetings earlier this year, the United States said it intended to withdraw "unless the president can identify terms that are more favourable to American businesses, workers, and taxpayers."

Trump 'not invited' to Paris climate summit

US President Donald Trump is not among the around 100 heads of state and government invited to next month's climate summit in Paris, a French presidential aide said Tuesday.

"For now, President Donald Trump is not invited," he said, while noting that representatives of the US government would attend.

Trump announced his decision to withdraw the United States from the historic 2015 Paris Agreement on limiting carbon emissions in June.

The pact calls for capping global warming at "well under" two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels, and 1.5 C if possible.

Around 800 organisations and public stakeholders will be on hand for the December 12 event to be held on Ile Seguin, an island in the Seine River southwest of Paris.

The meeting will follow the 23rd UN climate conference (COP23) that opened in Bonn, Germany, on Monday.

The Bonn meeting is dealing with mainly technical issues such as ensuring transparency and compliance, the reporting of emissions, and procedures for allocating climate funds.

The aide to French President Emmanuel Macron said the upcoming summit would aim to "build coalitions" involving cities, investment funds and development banks to further the goals of the accord.

"The idea is to show that there is action, that we must accelerate actions and find new sources of financing for very concrete projects," he said, calling the meeting "very complementary" to the COP23.