NEW YORK - A US citizen of Pakistani origin, who was arrested two months ago for allegedly planning to attack a Danish newspaper, now faces another charge of involvement in planning the 2008 attack in Mumbai, according to court documents filed by the US Justice Department. David Coleman Headley (or Daood Gilani, the name he was given at birth), who is 49 years old, was born in Washington, where his father and American mother worked at the Pakistan Embassy, he as a diplomat and she as a secretary. He allegedly attended Lashkar-e-Taiba-operated training camps in Pakistan and conspired with its members and others in planning and executing attacks in both Denmark and India, US law enforcement officials announced in Chicago, according to media reports. Headley, arrested in Chicago Oct 3, is cooperating in the investigation of both the Danish and Indian terror plots, officials said. He also was charged with helping to plan an attack against a Danish newspaper and two of its employees after the newspaper published irreverent cartoons of the Holy Prophet (Peace be upon him), which Muslims around the world found offensive. A Pakistan-born businessman, Tahawwur Rana, 45, who runs several businesses in Chicago and Toronto, was also arrested along with Headley. Rana and Headley have known each other since attending the Cadet College in Hasan Abdal in the entry class of 1974. Rana, a citizen of Canada, was not charged in the Mumbai attacks. But officials said the two men appeared to consult closely, and Headley posed as a representative of a company owned by Rana, according to media reports. In a bail hearing last week, Rana argued that he was duped by Headley. The Justice Department also announced Monday it had filed charges against Abdur Rehman Hashim Syed, a retired major in the Pakistani army, with collaborating in the plot against the Danish newspaper. This investigation remains active and ongoing, Patrick Fitzgerald, the United States attorney for the northern district of Illinois, was quoted as saying. Headley was charged in a 12-count indictment with six counts of conspiracy to bomb public places in India, to murder and maim persons in India and Denmark, to provide material support to foreign terrorist plots and to provide material support to Lashkar-e-Taiba, and six counts of aiding and abetting the murder of US citizens in India. About 170 people, including six Americans, died in the attacks on Indias financial and entertainment hub. In the indictment, Headley was charged with gathering surveillance in Mumbai by, among other things, opening an immigration services office as cover. He travelled between Mumbai and Pakistan on several occasions, the indictment said. Headley allegedly conducted surveillance elsewhere in India of facilities and locations that were not attacked in November 2008, the indictment said. This case serves as a reminder that the terrorist threat is global in nature and requires constant vigilance at home and abroad, said David Kris, Assistant Attorney-General for National Security. We continue to share leads developed in this investigation with our foreign and domestic law enforcement partners as we work together on this important matter. Serrill Headley, the mother of the accused, left her husband and her children and moved back to Philadelphia sometime in the early 1970s. She worked at various office jobs and borrowed enough money from a suitor to buy an old bar, which she named the Khyber Pass. In the late 1970s, she brought her adolescent son to Philadelphia to live with her. NEW YORK - A US citizen of Pakistani origin, who was arrested two months ago for allegedly planning to attack a Danish newspaper, now faces another charge of involvement in planning the 2008 attack in Mumbai, according to court documents filed by the US Justice Department. David Coleman Headley (or Daood Gilani, the name he was given at birth), who is 49 years old, was born in Washington, where his father and American mother worked at the Pakistan Embassy, he as a diplomat and she as a secretary. He allegedly attended Lashkar-e-Taiba-operated training camps in Pakistan and conspired with its members and others in planning and executing attacks in both Denmark and India, US law enforcement officials announced in Chicago, according to media reports. Headley, arrested in Chicago Oct 3, is cooperating in the investigation of both the Danish and Indian terror plots, officials said. He also was charged with helping to plan an attack against a Danish newspaper and two of its employees after the newspaper published irreverent cartoons of the Holy Prophet (Peace be upon him), which Muslims around the world found offensive. A Pakistan-born businessman, Tahawwur Rana, 45, who runs several businesses in Chicago and Toronto, was also arrested along with Headley. Rana and Headley have known each other since attending the Cadet College in Hasan Abdal in the entry class of 1974. Rana, a citizen of Canada, was not charged in the Mumbai attacks. But officials said the two men appeared to consult closely, and Headley posed as a representative of a company owned by Rana, according to media reports. In a bail hearing last week, Rana argued that he was duped by Headley. The Justice Department also announced Monday it had filed charges against Abdur Rehman Hashim Syed, a retired major in the Pakistani army, with collaborating in the plot against the Danish newspaper. This investigation remains active and ongoing, Patrick Fitzgerald, the United States attorney for the northern district of Illinois, was quoted as saying. Headley was charged in a 12-count indictment with six counts of conspiracy to bomb public places in India, to murder and maim persons in India and Denmark, to provide material support to foreign terrorist plots and to provide material support to Lashkar-e-Taiba, and six counts of aiding and abetting the murder of US citizens in India. About 170 people, including six Americans, died in the attacks on Indias financial and entertainment hub. In the indictment, Headley was charged with gathering surveillance in Mumbai by, among other things, opening an immigration services office as cover. He travelled between Mumbai and Pakistan on several occasions, the indictment said. Headley allegedly conducted surveillance elsewhere in India of facilities and locations that were not attacked in November 2008, the indictment said. This case serves as a reminder that the terrorist threat is global in nature and requires constant vigilance at home and abroad, said David Kris, Assistant Attorney-General for National Security. We continue to share leads developed in this investigation with our foreign and domestic law enforcement partners as we work together on this important matter. Serrill Headley, the mother of the accused, left her husband and her children and moved back to Philadelphia sometime in the early 1970s. She worked at various office jobs and borrowed enough money from a suitor to buy an old bar, which she named the Khyber Pass. In the late 1970s, she brought her adolescent son to Philadelphia to live with her.