CHINA     -   Parts of Texas remained underwater Friday after the remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda soaked the Houston area, leaving at least two people dead and prompting hundreds of rescues for people trapped during a relentless downpour that drew comparisons to Hurricane Harvey two years ago.

 Imelda’s aftermath is also blamed for major travel headaches as motorists slogged through water-swollen streets, air travelers faced flight delays and cancellations, and crews worked to determine whether any damage occurred after nine barges broke free of their moorings, two of which struck an Interstate 10 bridge over the San Jacinto River and prompted its closure.

The heaviest rainfall had ended by Thursday night in southeast Texas, but forecasters warned that parts of northeast Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Louisiana could see flash flooding as Imelda’s remnants shifted to the north. Officials in Harris County, which includes Houston, said there had been a combination of at least 1,700 high-water rescues and evacuations to get people to shelter as the longevity and intensity of the rain quickly came to surprise even those who had been bracing for floods.

The storm also flooded parts of southwestern Louisiana. More than 900 flights were canceled or delayed in Houston on Thursday. Further along the Texas Gulf Coast, authorities at one point warned that a levee could break near Beaumont in Jefferson County.

 

Pyongyang has repeatedly demanded that Washington reconsider its stance following the collapse of a February summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and Trump. ″(I) would like to welcome the wise political decision of President Trump to approach the DPRK-U.S. relations from a more practical point of view now that a nasty trouble-maker who used to face everything out of his anachronistic way of thinking has disappeared from the U.S. administration,” said Kim, the diplomat, referring to North Korea by its formal name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.