Robert Fisk

  • TRobert Fisk - The Syrian government has been advertising its victories of late. A vast international fair in Damascus, the reconstruction of the old city of Homs – though it has a long, long way to go – and a spankingly restored Sheraton Hotel next to the still sepulchral ruins of ...

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  • TOdd Karsten Tveit was always a very obsessional chap. Every story he covered, he always wanted to dig deeper, study further, hear one more tale of horror, one more joke, one more historical fact. We all covered the story of Israel’s wars in Lebanon, in 1978, in 1982, in 1996, in 2006. Over ...

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  • TIt’s not every day you get to queue for a ticket to the trial of Egypt’s first elected president. But there was Mr Fouad sitting in the government press centre - exactly where I first saw him 37 years ago - happily telling us all to come back after five o’clock, as if he was ...

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  • TThe Egyptian crucible has broken. The “unity” of Egypt - that all-embracing, patriotic, essential glue that has bound the nation together since the overthrow of the monarchy in 1952 and the rule of Nasser - has melted amid the massacres, gun battles and fury of Wednesday’s ...

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  • TAiman Husseini was lying by the wall. Khaled Abdul Nasser had his name written in black ink on his white shroud just to the left of the door. There were 37 corpses in the room. It was swamped in blood. The doctors had blood on their shirts. It wasn’t long before we had blood on our shoes. ...

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  • THand-picked to a man. That’s what you can say about the “candidates” for Iran’s presidential election this week. The Guardian Council has ensured that the eight men - all are indeed men, of course - have the approval of the Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei. Power remains with ...

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  • T There are not many unsung heroes in the Syrian war, but Khaled Erksoussi and his 9,000 volunteers have got to be among them.Convoying food and medical aid across the front lines of this tragic conflict, arguing and cajoling and pleading and negotiating their way between enemies must place you ...

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  • T“He needs multiple surgery outside Iraq. It’s a dysfunctional problem. He has no hearing in his left ear. They told me he has to be six before they can remove cartilage from his chest wall to put in his ear. All operations have to be outside Iraq to beautify the ear and give him his ...

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  • T No entry to the International Red Cross. Not yet. Maybe in a few days, when the area has been secured. Men and boys separated from the women and children. Streams of refugees. Women, children, the old, few males. Stories of men being loaded on to trucks and taken away. Destination unknown. ...

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  • T Same Old Story. Journalists shouldn’t use the phrase, but what else can I say when I prowl through press reports? Take the following. “It is slowly dawning... that the Americans are really going home, that there will be a ceasefire in this country soon, and then a march to the US... ...

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  • T If Israel really attacks Iran this year, it – and the Americans – will be dottier than their enemies think. True, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is not right, but then so is Avigdor Lieberman, who is apparently the Israeli Foreign Minister. Maybe the two want to do each other a favour. But why ...

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  • T So now it's snapshots of US Marines pissing on the Afghan dead. Better, I suppose, than the US soldiers pictured beside the innocent Afghan teenager they fragged back in March of last year. Or the female guard posing with the dead Iraqi prisoner at Abu Ghraib. Not to mention Haditha or the murder ...

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  • T It took Indigènes to remind the French that they owed their liberation not only to De Gaulle’s largely white Free French troops but also to 134,000 Algerian soldiers, 73,000 Moroccans, 26,000 Tunisians and 92,000 “others” from Sub-Saharan Africa.Indigènes means ...

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  • TIt was Baha Mousas dad I will always remember. On an oppressively scorching day in Basra, Daoud Mousa first spoke of his sons death, telling me how the boys wife had died of cancer just six months earlier, how Bahas children were now orphans, how not long after the British Army had arrested Baha ...

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  • TSomething has gone badly wrong with the Egyptian revolution. The ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces just what the Supreme bit means is anyones guess is toadying up to middle-aged Muslim Brothers and Salafists, the generals chatting to the pseudo-Islamists while the young, the liberal, ...

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  • TMore than six years after ex-prime minister Rafiq Hariri was blown up by a truck bomb on the Beirut Corniche along with 21 other Lebanese, a UN Special Tribunal has blamed four Hezbollah officials for the assassination and issued arrest warrants for the quartet. The UN initially pointed the finger ...

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  • TDeep underground missile silos with iron roofs, a televised launch of Irans Shehab-3 missiles with a 2,000km range (and we all know what that means) even a suitably Islamic title to the military games, Great Prophet-6, the whole shebang. Nothing new, of course, for the Islamic Republic has been ...

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  • TThere are some individual things in life so terrible, so unspeakable, so hideous that ordinary language no longer works A few days ago, Isis Nassar, a 54-year-old British-Lebanese artist, a woman who paints portraits and landscapes filled with so much colour that they almost glow in the dark, was ...

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  • TI hate being called a war reporter. Firstly, because there is an unhappy flavour of the junkie about it. Secondly, because you cannot report a war without knowing the politics behind it. Could Ed Murrow or Richard Dimbleby have covered the Second World War without understanding Chamberlains policy ...

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  • TAmid the fury of the Arab awakening not to mention our own deepening crisis over Libya old Constantinople is a tonic, a reminder amid minarets and water, palaces and museums and bookshops and an ancient parliament and a thousand fish restaurants that this really was the only united capital the ...

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  • TBlood turns brown with age. Revolutions do not. Vile rags now hang in a corner of the square, the last clothes worn by the martyrs of Tahrir: a doctor, a lawyer among them, a young woman, their pictures strewn above the crowds, the fabric of the T-shirts and trousers stained the colour of mud. But ...

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